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Issues of COVID-19-Related Distance Learning for Children With Neuronopathic Mucopolysaccharidoses

key information

source: Molecular genetics and metabolism

authors: Eisengart JB,Esler AN,Ellinwood NM,Hudock RL,King KE,Klein TL,Lee C,Morton J,Stephens K,Ziegler R,O'Neill C

summary/abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the education of children around the world, forcing a large proportion of teaching to be carried out remotely. The implications of this disruption have yet to be fully elucidated, but initial assessments suggest that COVID-19-related school closures and reliance on virtual learning may have a long-term negative impact on educational attainment and future earnings as well as life expectancy of children in the United States. Among children with neurodegenerative disorders, such as neuronopathic mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS disorders), the effects of the pandemic are likely to be even greater. We aim to shine a spotlight on the impact of COVID-19 on the education, treatment and general wellbeing of children and families affected by MPS disorders by highlighting the important role that educators and therapists play in supporting the neurocognitive function and quality of life of children with neuronopathic MPS disorders. This article will serve as a resource that caregivers, educators, clinicians and therapists can use when considering how best to advocate for children with neuronopathic MPS disorders in circumstances where in-school teaching or in-clinic treatment is compromised or not possible. Given that the current pandemic is likely to have a prolonged course and impact and that similar epidemics and pandemics are a near certainty in the future, it is essential that steps are taken to support the learning and care of children with neuronopathic MPS disorders. We must prioritize strategies to safely resume this fragile community’s access to in-person education and supportive care, and to address gaps that have emerged during prolonged pauses in access, whenever possible.

organization: Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Electronic address: eisen139@umn.edu.

DOI: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2021.06.012

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